Clayton Hutson and the role of technology in the live music industry

Clayton Hutson believes live music is much more than just music played on a venture. It must be a sensorial experience. Live music has to give chills and unforgettable moments. The music industry is filled with pioneering technologic advancements so you need to be constantly actualized in order to be successful and not to become obsolete. The live music experience must go beyond just a gigantic screen playing some videos and images behind the performing artist. This is amazing but is plain. It’s not a stimulating experience; it does not capture the essence of what a live show must be. You need to be creative to surprise you audience without relying on simply showing images in a high-definition surface. He says he enjoys and admires artists like P!Ink (who worked with Clay on her I’m Not Dead Tour) and Lady Gaga because they “incorporate a lot of acrobatics, and aerial stunts, into their routines”. The artist’s performance is not just music, it involves a particular form: the way the artist shows his art, how they express the feeling they’re trying to transmit to the spectators with their music. Learn more: http://www.digico.biz/docs/latest_news/EkFlpVAlpkPbdvCaIx.shtml

 

Technology must be a helping hand of this rounded way of perceiving artistic performance. Not the easy shock that’s alike the easy scare of a horror film, but a perdurable image on the minds of the audience. That’s why one of his favorite brands on the industry is DiGiCo. While working on Aaron Lewis on his debut solo tour, he wanted a console small enough to be comfortable to travel with while on tour, and not be at the sake of local production companies who had fairly suboptimal gear. This would allow him to be as faithful as possible to the sounds played by Lewis’ music. To be able to deliver a complete and deep experience to his audience. The DiGiCo SD11 allowed him to make justice to the instruments played by the former Staind frontman, especially his classic Gibson acoustic guitars so they may sound as pristine and clean as they could. This is just a small example of Hutson’s philosophy: technology must be always at the service of the show; not as a quick shock, but as a way to provide a more pure performance and to give the audience a profound and haunting experience.